Refereed Talk Deadline Approaching

The refereed talk deadline for Linux Plumbers Conference is only a few weeks off, September 1, 2016 at 11:59PM CET. So there is still some time to get your proposals in, but time is growing short.

Note that this year’s Plumbers is co-located with Linux Kernel Summit rather than LinuxCon, so the refereed track is all Plumbers this year. We are therefore looking forward to seeing your all-Plumbers refereed-track submission!

As you might have noticed, earlybird registration has closed, but normal-rate registration will be opening up on August 27th—however, accepted refereed speaking proposals will receive a free pass.

The conference itself is in Santa Fe, New Mexico on November 1-4, 2016. Looking forward to seeing you there!

Wireless Workshop accepted into the 2016 Linux Kernel Summit and Linux Plumbers Conference

It might well be that wireless networking recently made the transition from an ubiquitous networking technology to the dominant networking technology, at least from the viewpoint of end-user devices. Part of this trend is the use of wireless in automobiles, and this workshop will look at Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments (WAVE), also know as IEEE 802.11p. In addition, the bufferbloat problem is starting to focus on the more difficult wireless environment, and to that end, this workshop will discuss FQ/Codel integration, testing, and development. As usual, the workshop will encompass the full 802.11 stack, not just the kernel portions, and therefore wpa_supplicant will also be on the agenda.

Please join us for a timely and important discussion!

Earlybird Registration for Plumbers nearly Full

As of today, we only have 25% of the places remaining out of our quota of 140 for earlybird registration.  Once this fills up, general registration will close until 27 August when we’ll add 50 more slots at the regular rate.

Android/Mobile Microconference Accepted into 2016 Linux Plumbers Conference

Android continues to find interesting new applications and problems to solve, both within and outside the mobile arena. Mainlining continues to be an area of focus, as do a number of areas of core Android functionality, including the kernel. Other topics include efficient operation on big.LITTLE systems, support for HiKey in AOSP (and multi-device support in general), and the upcoming migration to Clang for Android builds.

Android continues to be a very exciting and dynamic project, with the above topics merely scratching the surface. For more details, see the Android/Mobile Microconference wiki page.

LPC 2016 registration is now Open

Early bird rate is available until our quota of 140 runs out (or we reach 26 August).  Please click here to register.

Registration Opening Delayed until Monday 6 June

A while ago, we decided to combine the Kernel Summit Open Day with Linux Plumbers, meaning that Plumbers itself runs now from 1-4 November (as you can see from the updated site banners).  Unfortunately, we neglected to test that the registration system was ready for this change, so we’re scrambling now to fix it and we should have registrations open by Monday.  Sorry for the Delay.

Tracing Microconference Accepted into 2016 Linux Plumbers Conference

After taking a break in 2015, Tracing is back at Plumbers this year! Tracing is heavily used throughout the Linux ecosystem, and provides an essential method for extracting information about the underlying code that is running on the system. Although tracing is simple in concept, effective usage and implementation can be quite involved.

Topics proposed for this year’s event include new features in the BPF compiler collection, perf, and ftrace; visualization frameworks; large-scale tracing and distributed debugging; always-on analytics and monitoring; do-it-yourself tracing tools; and, last but not least, a kernel-tracing wishlist.

We hope to see you there!

Checkpoint-Restore Microconference Accepted into 2016 Linux Plumbers Conference

This year will feature a four-fold deeper dive into checkpoint-restore technology, thanks to participation by people from a number of additional related projects! These are the OpenMPI message-passing library, Berkeley Lab Checkpoint/Restart (BLCR), and Distributed MultiThreaded CheckPointing (DMTCP) (not to be confused with TCP/IP), in addition to the Checkpoint/Restore in Userspace group that has participated in prior years.

Docker integration remains a hot topic, as is post-copy live migration, as well as testing/validation. As you might guess from the inclusion of people from BLCR and OpenMPI, checkpoint-restore for distributed workloads (rather than just single systems) is an area of interest.

Please join us for a timely and important discussion!

Testing & Fuzzing Microconference Accepted into 2016 Linux Plumbers Conference

Testing, fuzzing, and other diagnostics have made the Linux ecosystem much more robust than in the past, but there are still embarrassing bugs. Furthermore, million-year bugs will be happening many times per day across Linux’s huge installed base, so there is clearly need for even more aggressive validation.

The Testing and Fuzzing Microconference aims to significantly increase the aggression level of Linux-kernel validation, with discussions on tools and test suites including kselftest, syzkaller, trinity, mutation testing, and the 0day Test Robot. The effectiveness of these tools will be attested to by any of their victims, but we must further raise our game as the installed base of Linux continues to increase.

One additional way of raising the level of testing aggression is to document the various ABIs in machine-readable format, thus lowering the barrier to entry for new projects. Who knows? Perhaps Linux testing will be driven by artificial-intelligence techniques!

Join us for an important and spirited discussion!

Device Tree Microconference Accepted into 2016 Linux Plumbers Conference

Device-tree discussions are probably not quite as spirited as in the past, however, device tree is an active area. In particular, significant issues remain.

This microconference will cover the updated device-tree specification, debugging, bindings validation, and core-kernel code directions. In addition, there will be discussion of what does (and does not) go into the device tree, along with the device-creation and driver binding ordering swamp.

Join us for an important and spirited discussion!