http://summit.ubuntu.com/lpc-2012/ Core OS

Wednesday 10:45 - 11:30 PDT
Not Attending The Core OS
The term “Core OS” has recently been coined in an LWN article, describing the core (userspace) bits of an operating system. In this talk we want to give a quick overview of what we believe the Linux “Core OS” consists of technically, we want to draw the line where we believe the various projects belong in this (such as systemd, udev, dbus, …), and where they don’t, and where we want to go with this in the future. Topic Lead: Kay Sievers Topic Lead: Lennart Pottering

Participants:
attending kaysievers (Kay Sievers)

Tracks:
  • Core OS
Nautilus 2
Wednesday 11:40 - 12:25 PDT
Not Attending The 0.5 second software update
Three years ago at the inaugural Linux Plumbers Conference, we showed that a Linux OS should boot to the UI in 5 seconds or less. Since then, much has happened to take this from prototype to general deployed production technology. However, booting is only one of the operations for which the performance matters to users. The performance, and capabilities of the software update and associated tooling have an even bigger impact on the experience of the user than just booting in 2 seconds does. In this presentation I'll show what a 0.5 second software update looks like. However, since it'd boring to just show that you can be 300 times better than the yum tooling, I'll also show how what options this capability opens for those who develop operating systems to service their userbase better. The revealing of the code and project that showcase these capabilities will happen at the time of the LPC presentation. I'll likely will have a few other surprises ready by LPC as well; there's still time left between now and LPC. Topic Lead: Arjan van de Ven Arjan van de Ven is a Sr Principal Engineer at Intel's Open Source Technology Center, where he works on various things Linux, ranging from general kernel technology to power and performance tools and optimizations.

Participants:
attending eblake (Eric Blake)
attending kaysievers (Kay Sievers)

Tracks:
  • Core OS
Nautilus 4
Thursday 09:30 - 10:15 PDT
Not Attending UEFI Basics Tutorial
Covers: - UEFI basics on what appears in UEFI 2.3.1 spec'd systems with UEFI operating systems - requirements of both the OS and firmware for UEFI 2.3.1 secure boot - PXE network boot services(IPv6 andIPV4). Abstract will be available soon Instructor: Harry Hsiung (Intel)

Participants:
attending srwarren (Stephen Warren)

Tracks:
  • Core OS
Nautilus 5
Thursday 10:25 - 11:10 PDT
Not Attending UEFI Basics Tutorial
Covers: - UEFI basics on what appears in UEFI 2.3.1 spec'd systems with UEFI operating systems - requirements of both the OS and firmware for UEFI 2.3.1 secure boot - PXE network boot services(IPv6 andIPV4). Abstract will be available soon Instructor: Harry Hsiung (Intel)

Participants:
attending srwarren (Stephen Warren)

Tracks:
  • Core OS
Nautilus 5
Thursday 11:20 - 12:05 PDT
Not Attending UEFI Basics Tutorial
Covers: - UEFI basics on what appears in UEFI 2.3.1 spec'd systems with UEFI operating systems - requirements of both the OS and firmware for UEFI 2.3.1 secure boot - PXE network boot services(IPv6 andIPV4). Abstract will be available soon Instructor: Harry Hsiung (Intel)

Participants:
attending srwarren (Stephen Warren)

Tracks:
  • Core OS
Nautilus 5
Thursday 13:30 - 14:15 PDT
Not Attending The Core OS Wish List
In the context of systemd we started collecting nice-to-have or that-should-just-work items, which we would wish the Linux kernel would provide us with. The emails to LKML have been called "A Plumber's Wish List for Linux". We give a quick update what problems have been solved, and what we still wish would work. Topic Lead: Lennart Poettering Topic Lead: Kay Sievers Lennart Poettering and Kay Sievers are the maintainers of systemd and udev and spend almost their entire work time on building infrastructure for the Linux Core OS.

Participants:
attending eblake (Eric Blake)
attending kaysievers (Kay Sievers)

Tracks:
  • Core OS
Nautilus 2
Thursday 15:20 - 16:05 PDT
Not Attending Atomic upgrades, booting, and package systems
Current major consumer operating systems like Microsoft Windows and the Playstation 3 explicitly warn the user "don't turn off your computer" for upgrades. But the state of the art in many Linux-based "distributions" is to simply ignore this; if you happen to lose power or the kernel crashes, your system is quite likely toast, and you need a recovery CD. This isn't acceptable. This presentation will discuss my research into the area, working prototype code, and further work necessary in the core plumbing (particularly bootup and configuration management) to get fully atomic upgrades. Topic Lead: Colin Walters Colin has contributed to many different Free and Open Source software projects, including GNU Emacs, Debian, rpm, and dbus, but primarily works on GNOME for Red Hat, Inc.

Participants:
attending kaysievers (Kay Sievers)

Tracks:
  • Core OS
Nautilus 2
Friday 09:10 - 09:55 PDT
Not Attending Petitboot && /boot Unification
=== Petitboot - A kexec based bootloader === Petitboot is a platform independent bootloader based on the Linux kexec warm reboot mechanism. Petitboot supports loading kernel and initrd image files from any mountable Linux device, plus can load image files from the network using TFTP, NFS, HTTP, HTTPS, and SFTP. Petitboot can boot any operating system supported by kexec. In essence, petitboot is a user friendly front end to the Linux exec program. If installed as a standard user program petitboot can be used as a convenient menu based way to initiate a kexec system reboot. A petitboot package is already available for several Linux distributions. Petitboot can also be used as a traditional 2nd stage bootloader by including the petitboot program and necessary dependencies like busybox and kexec-tools in the embedded initramfs of a Linux kernel image and converting that kernel image to a form that is loadable by the 1st stage bootloader. The method of creating the initramfs, converting the Linux kernel image to a 2nd stage bootloader image, and arranging for the petitboot program and its dependencies to be started on boot are all specific to the platform, the Linux distribution, and the 1st stage bootloader. Discussions in this session can explore methods to prepare a petitboot 2nd stage package for various distributions, requests for petitboot enhancements, etc. Topic Lead: Geoff Levand <email address hidden> Geoff is a Linux Architect at the Huawei R&D Center in San Jose, California. In his spare time he maintains the Petitboot bootloader, the TWIN windowing system, and Linux support for the Sony Playstation 3 game console. === Peace, Love, and Unification in /boot === A simple filesystem layout for command line parameters, kernel and initramfs images. /boot might be managed by multiple distributions. These distributions fight over the boot loader configuration and don't know much about each other. In this session a proposal for a simple filesystem layout is presented, which can be used as the base for boot loaders without a special configuration file. This also obsoletes the need of regenerating a configuration file (grub-mkconfig) after dropping in files via package managers. Topic Lead: Harald Hoyer Harald joined the Linux community in 1996. His first kernel patch was the module ip_masq_quake in 1997, followed by boot support for md raid devices. He joined Red Hat in July of 1999, working on projects ranging from udev, network daemons and CD recording packages to creating configuration tools, extending smolt and writing python interfaces. Lately he created a cross distribution initramfs generator called dracut.

Participants:
attending eblake (Eric Blake)
attending kaysievers (Kay Sievers)

Tracks:
  • Core OS
Nautilus 3
Friday 11:55 - 12:40 PDT
Not Attending CoreOS: Initramfs Systemd && libkmod
=== Systemd in the Initramfs === Introduction of a systemd based initramfs to boot a system, for which an initramfs is needed. Topic Lead: Harald Hoyer Harald joined the Linux community in 1996. His first kernel patch was the module ip_masq_quake in 1997, followed by boot support for md raid devices. He joined Red Hat in July of 1999, working on projects ranging from udev, network daemons and CD recording packages to creating configuration tools, extending smolt and writing python interfaces. Lately he created a cross distribution initramfs generator called dracut. === From libabc to libkmod: designing core libraries === On Kernel Summit last year Kay and and Lennart put together a wish list for Linux. From the discussions was born libabc as way to help people to design core libraries and therefore help userspace to make use of Linux features. Libkmod is the first library to use their library skeleton to implement one of the items in the wish list: create a library to manage kernel modules and refactor module-init-tools to use it. In this discussion we will share the experience gained with this task, how libabc helped kmod to replace module-init-tools on all major distributions after less than half a year and how other core developers could benefit from that. Topic Lead: Lucas De Marchi <email address hidden> Lucas started to work with Linux at University of Sao Paulo while doing his undergraduate course in computer engineering. He completed his master's degree at Politecnico di Milano in 2009. His research focused on optimizations to the real-time Linux scheduler on multi-core architectures. In 2010, Lucas joined ProFUSION Embedded Systems and continued to work with embedded systems where he got involved with several open source projects such as BlueZ, oFono, ConnMan, EFL, WebKit, systemd and others. Currently he's the lead developer of kmod which is the subject of this talk.

Participants:
attending eblake (Eric Blake)
attending kaysievers (Kay Sievers)

Tracks:
  • Core OS
Nautilus 3
Friday 14:10 - 14:55 PDT
Not Attending Systemd for the User Session
It's a little known secret that systemd is extremely capable of starting, controlling and regulating more than just system services, but can easily start an entire Desktop UI. Not many people have sat down and implemented and worked out the problems of starting an X service, a few UI components, the session bus and DBus services for normal users with the mechanisms that systemd provides. The benefits are obvious: Systemd provides excellent service monitoring and restarting capabilities, provides socket and DBus activation for relevant services, and overall improves desktop startup by allowing user services to start well before core services like Xorg or wayland start. In effect, we're saying goodbye to XDG autostart entirely, and getting back reliability and scalability. We converted several desktop environments including Tizen's Mobile UI, Xfce4, Enlightenment and more to systemd user sessions. We "pop the hood" and take a look at the implications for startup, what's possible to further improve on the session startup and where we can do better. Topic Lead: Auke KokAuke Kok <email address hidden> Auke is a software engineer at Intel's Open Source Technology center, and has been attempting to make Linux boot faster since 2007. In 2008, he co-presented the "5-second boot" with Arjan van de Ven at the first LPC. Since then, Auke has worked on further improving the Linux Core OS start sequence, first for Moblin and later with MeeGo, where we made the first switch to systemd. Auke now works on Tizen, which will heavily integrate systemd in the Core OS.

Participants:
attending eblake (Eric Blake)

Tracks:
  • Core OS
Nautilus 2

PLEASE NOTE The Linux Plumbers Conference 2012 schedule is still in a draft format and is subject to changes at any time.