http://summit.ubuntu.com/lpc-2012/ File and Storage Systems

Thursday 09:30 - 10:15 PDT
Not Attending System Storage Manager; A single tool to manage your storage
In more sophisticated enterprise storage environments, management with Device Mapper (dm), Logical Volume Manager (LVM), or Multiple Devices (md) is becoming increasingly more difficult. With file systems added to the mix, the number of tools needed to configure and manage storage has grown so large that it is simply not user friendly. With so many options for a system administrator to consider, the opportunity for errors and problems is large. The btrfs administration tools have shown us that storage management can be simplified, and we are working to bring that ease of use to Linux storage in general. I would like to introduce the new easy to use command line interface to manage your storage using various technologies like lvm, btrfs, crypt and more. System Storage Manager is currently under development with lots of features already available and more to come. I will discuss those features and problems we are facing when getting the project ready. I will also describe the scope of this project as well as where we see it in the future and of course gather useful feedback from the audience. Topic Lead: Lukas Czerner (<email address hidden>) Lukas is one of the core ext4 developers employed by Red Hat, Inc located in Czech Republic. He has been involved in performance evaluation of Linux discard support and was examining of alternative approaches which led to establishing the interface for filesystem batched discard support aka FITRIM as well as implementation for Ext4/3 filesystems. He is actively working on improvements of ext4 file system, its user space utilities. He is currently is working on simplification of constructing and administrating heterogeneous storage using various technologies like dm, md file systems and brtfs which resulted in System Storage Manager tool.

Participants:
attending ricwheeler (Ric Wheeler)

Tracks:
  • File and Storage Systems
Nautilus 4
Thursday 10:25 - 11:10 PDT
Not Attending External Storage Array Management API
The ability to manage external storage arrays and exploit the advanced features they provide in a programmatic way is an important capability for Linux. However, achieving storage array API nirvana isn't an easy thing to do with numerous obstacles in its path (e.g. licensing, terminology, features). In this session I would like to give a brief introduction to the libStorageMgmt project I am working on, discuss the difficulties it has encountered, and have an open discussion on how it can best work with other storage management components. Topic Lead: Tony Asleson Tony has a long and varied history of working in the storage industry and Linux. When he isn't sitting in front of his computer screen or spending time with his familiy, he can be found rock climbing and touring the back roads of MN on two wheels. He is currently a member of the Red Hat kernel storage team and lives in Rochester, MN.

Participants:
attending ricwheeler (Ric Wheeler)

Tracks:
  • File and Storage Systems
Nautilus 4
Thursday 11:20 - 12:05 PDT
Not Attending Anaconda, Snapper and Booting
Topic Lead: Peter Jones Topic Lead: Matthias G. Eckermann Topic Lead: David Cantrell

Participants:
attending ricwheeler (Ric Wheeler)

Tracks:
  • File and Storage Systems
Nautilus 4
Thursday 13:30 - 14:15 PDT
Not Attending Configuration and Management Open Discussion

Participants:
attending ricwheeler (Ric Wheeler)

Tracks:
  • File and Storage Systems
Nautilus 4
Thursday 14:25 - 15:10 PDT
Not Attending Local File Systems
Topic Lead: Chris Mason Topic Lead: Ric Wheeler

Participants:
attending ricwheeler (Ric Wheeler)

Tracks:
  • File and Storage Systems
Nautilus 4
Thursday 15:20 - 16:05 PDT
Not Attending Hinting vs Heuristics: Plumbing I/O Cache Hints Through the Linux Storage Stack
The Linux-storage and wider storage community are actively investigating ways to express and leverage the varying performance characterics of storage devices. A storage device may do a better job servicing the I/O stream if it can discern details deeper than just the currently requested block address range. The T10 committee is in the process of specifying a hinting scheme to classify the in-flight data in a SCSI request. Similarly, a filesystem can do a better job of allocation if it is given some explicit hints from the application about how a file will be used. EXT4 is investigating an O_HOT/O_COLD hint that applications could use to express a coarse quality of service for a given file. At the same time, bcache has arrived as a stacking block device driver that uses heuristics to guide the decision of whether an I/O request should be cached in a high performance device or passed on to the next tier in the storage hierarchy. This presentation investigates an approach to plumbing hints through the filesystem to be consumed by a modified bcache block device. The tradeoffs between hinting and heuristics, as well as a proposed mechanism for specifying cache policy in userspace, are explored. The target audience is kernel filesystem/block developers and application developers that want to express caching or other policies to a storage configuration. Topic Lead: Dan Williams (<email address hidden>) Dan is a Linux-storage developer at Intel. He contributed support for offloading raid5/6 calculations, developed bios-raid support for md/mdadm, and currently maintains the libsas based isci driver. He has presented at the Ottawa Linux Symposium, the Linux Storage Summit, and authored an article for LWN.net.

Participants:
attending ricwheeler (Ric Wheeler)

Tracks:
  • File and Storage Systems
Nautilus 4
Thursday 16:30 - 17:15 PDT
Not Attending NFS Advanced Projects
Topic Lead: Jeff Layton Jeff is a long-time Linux enthusiast. After working as a Unix System Administrator for almost a decade, he joined the Red Hat kernel engineering team in 2007, focusing mainly on NFS and CIFS. He is also a member of the worldwide Samba team by virtue of his work on the Linux kernel CIFS filesystem. Topic Lead: Bruce Fields Bruce has worked on the Linux NFS code since 2002, first at the University of Michigan and then since 2010 at Red Hat. He maintains the kernel's NFS server, contributes to the IETF's NFSv4 working group, and generally enjoys solving problems wherever they turn up. Topic Lead: Chuck Lever

Participants:
attending ricwheeler (Ric Wheeler)

Tracks:
  • File and Storage Systems
Nautilus 4
Thursday 17:25 - 18:10 PDT
Not Attending NFS Advanced Projects
Topic Lead: Jeff Layton Jeff is a long-time Linux enthusiast. After working as a Unix System Administrator for almost a decade, he joined the Red Hat kernel engineering team in 2007, focusing mainly on NFS and CIFS. He is also a member of the worldwide Samba team by virtue of his work on the Linux kernel CIFS filesystem. Topic Lead: Bruce Fields Bruce has worked on the Linux NFS code since 2002, first at the University of Michigan and then since 2010 at Red Hat. He maintains the kernel's NFS server, contributes to the IETF's NFSv4 working group, and generally enjoys solving problems wherever they turn up. Topic Lead: Chuck Lever

Participants:
attending ricwheeler (Ric Wheeler)

Tracks:
  • File and Storage Systems
Nautilus 4

PLEASE NOTE The Linux Plumbers Conference 2012 schedule is still in a draft format and is subject to changes at any time.